All posts by Eurotech

Level 5 Autonomous Driving Challenges

The challenges of Level 5 Autonomous Driving

Autonomous Driving is classified according to the amount of human driver intervention and ranges from Level 0 (no automation) up to Level 5 (full automation).

Enabling Level 5 Autonomous Driving in Automotive, Defense and other Industries requires collecting, storing and processing data at an unprecedented degree, which has been until now unattainable by Embedded Devices and Edge Computers.

Companies in the Automotive industry are spending billions of dollars in investments for developing Level 5 Autonomous Driving technologies. All these players are encountering a number of new challenges that span across many disciplines and technologies.

Performance

Sensors, LIDARS and other technologies supporting autonomous driving generate unprecedented amounts of data that require ultra-high computational performance that goes beyond the traditional embedded computer capabilities.

Some sophisticated sensors require a bandwidth of 40Gb/s to transfer data, not only in peak conditions, but for continuous operations. Moreover, Level 5 Autonomous Driving applications require constant, reliable and real-time operations while keeping latency as low as possible.

Storage capacity

Level 5 Autonomous Driving applications largely exceed the storage capacity of typical embedded computing devices. Thinking about the 40Gb/s bandwidth mentioned above, it translates to almost 20TB in only an hour of operations.

Ruggedness

High Performance Embedded Computing (HPEC) systems and data loggers installed on vehicles must provide reliable, continuous operations for long period of time in very harsh environment, withstanding shocks, vibrations, dusty environments and wide temperature ranges.

DynaCOR 40-34 High Performance Embedded Computing system for Level 5 Autonomous Driving

Certifications

Embedded and electronic systems and Edge Computers installed into vehicles must comply with industry standards.

Automotive certifications, such as E-Mark and IEC 60068-2-6 / 60068-2-27 for shock and vibration are objective ways for characterizing the behavior of the system under stress in actual operating conditions.

Compactness

Space is more than often at a premium in embedded applications. Systems designed to fit into embedded environments must come with compact size, to be easily installed into vehicles.

However, HPEC systems provide tremendous amount of computational power and they easily heat up: dissipating such an intense heat would require a proper and powerful cooling system that can be easily installed in the vehicle.

Cooling

High Performance Computing systems are typically bulkier than embedded systems due to heat dissipation issues: they are usually equipped with big fans that cannot be used in embedded applications where performance is sacrificed to adapt to space constraints.

However, High Performance Embedded Computing systems for Autonomous Driving must provide HPC performances into a vehicle.

Eurotech has a lot of expertise in designing liquid-cooled HPC (High Performance Computing) and HPEC systems. Liquid cooling is an ideal solution for HPEC systems in Autonomous Driving, as most of the cars are already equipped with liquid cooling systems.

Compared to air cooling, liquid cooling allows more computational density and a better energy efficiency: even though Eurotech’s HPEC systems can use up to 500W, the coolant would maintain a temperature of around 41-43°C.

 

The DynaCOR 40-34 and the DynaCOR 50-35 are unique examples of High Performance Embedded Computing systems that comply with all these requirements, winning the challenges of Level 5 Autonomous Driving: they provide flexible and configurable platforms that allow the creation of in-vehicle Data Centers.

3 key railway standards with which every on-board embedded and IoT system should comply

Railway companies looking for new on-board electronic equipment or intelligent transportation systems should consider products that follow specific requirements in terms of operating temperature, shock and vibration resistance, EMC, and so on, in order to guarantee consistent and reliable performance in harsh and contaminated environments such as trains.

That is why on-board electronic devices like IoT gateways, edge computers and intelligent transportation systems should comply with the parameters defined by specific railway certifications. We will discuss three key standard requirements to meet the needs of today’s on-board railway and rolling stock applications..

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Does your enterprise depend on the Mobile Edge? Considerations for mobile computing at the edge of fleet enterprises

In the United States alone there are over 26 million commercial vehicles on the roadways and in operations1, ranging across the spectrum of logistics and heavy moving equipment to agriculture equipment and waste management vehicles.  In today’s connected enterprises, these commercial fleets are managed through tightly integrated operational systems that perform a multitude of services, including fleet management (automatic vehicle location, asset tracking, route optimization), monitoring of vehicle health and diagnostics, vehicle operator console operations, electronic data recording, and video capture.  These systems improve operational efficiencies, reduce costs, and enable delivery of enhanced services.

Enabling technology for all of these applications is the “Mobile Edge”, the ability to extend an enterprise’s operational systems to mobile computing platforms on deployed fleet vehicles.  A variety of options present themselves to both operators deploying these systems and technology companies offering communications solutions to those operators.  In choosing the right solution for the Mobile Edge, the operator or integrator must consider both hardware and software aspects of their system requirements.

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IT-Centric IoT Device Management

The edge of the IoT is where solutions connect, communicate and interact using sensors, actuators, gateways, agents and controllers. As technology advances vendors are touting “advanced management capabilities” for these devices at the edge. These capabilities vary, ranging from the simple ability to turn a device on and off to more complex actions such as updating software, managing Wifi connections, configuring security policies or changing data parameters.esf_framework

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The Benefits of a Java-Based Application Framework for IoT Projects

IoT projects present many challenges, even when the hardware is designed exactly to customer specifications. Building on proven architecture and software building blocks that would require many years to develop, the use of a Java-based IoT application framework will result in shorter, more deterministic device software development. Using an IT-centric approach to implement the device logic in smart edge devices improves both device management and embedded application management. Once this standard software platform is in place, connecting and getting business relevant data to the cloud is simpler than it ever has been before.

An advanced software framework that leverages OSGi and Java both isolates the developer from the complexity of the hardware and communications infrastructure and also complements the Multi-Service Gateway hardware for an integrated hardware and software solution.

MSGateway_Gate_Text

The benefits of IT-centric application development to implement business logic in smart edge devices/service gateways are:

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agriculture wine plants

The Internet of Things: how IoT helps producing high quality wine

It’s easy to slip into the habit of thinking of the Internet of Things as a highly technical, industrial tool at home in factories, or fleets of high powered vehicles, but who’d have thought it can also help plants grow?

It can be near impossible to predict what any one growing season will bring. So much is at the mercy of the weather, availability or certification of crop protection products and numerous other factors which have to be given a ‘best guess’ in order to plan for them. The best way to predict the most likely outcome in any season is, of course, experience.

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How Important is it to Protect Athletes from Concussion and Injury?

Football Player

Sports are fun. Fun to play, fun to watch, and I hear they can even be fun to coach. When I was kid running cross-country, the biggest challenge was getting up the killer hill on the Montpelier, VT high school course. My kids played different sports growing up, where they were getting into tight quarters, battling for a puck or ball with one or more players at a time. Their challenges in the midst of a competition required serious pads and gear to protect their growing bodies. I know from experience as a parent how important it is to protect all athletes from concussion and injury, from the youngest lacrosse player to the professional football player.

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Think about IoT Security Holistically

As new technology evolves, it is not uncommon for both vendors and customers to jump on the bandwagon before thinking about the overarching issues, such as security.  The Internet of Things presents a whole new set of security concerns – from the device side to the cloud and everywhere in between.  Security is all too often an afterthought in IoT deployments.

Eurotech has been considering IoT security from the start and we believe in thinking about IoT security holistically.  Our priority is to maintain customer trust and confidence by ensuring the integrity, availability and confidentiality of customer data.  There is no singular IoT security solution, however creating a secure system is a step by step process to ensure total data integrity.

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Going from Maker to Developer

Open source hardware can be a great starting point for skunkworks projects and weekend hobbyists, and may even make sense for developers trying out their earliest concepts. Students, hackers, and experimenters find the cheap, open source hardware to be readily available and all that they need for their side projects.

For engineers and developers in the corporate world, responsible for creating dependable and specialized products, there comes a time when a project is ready to move from a resource-constrained ideation phase to full on product development. Rugged, small form factor, highly integrated embedded computer boards like Eurotech’s CPU-351-13 are what product development teams rely on to evolve quickly and successfully from early concepts to saleable products that are backed by a strong business case.

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First “Little” Data, then Big Data

The quantity of digital data has exploded to roughly 2.5 quintillion bytes of data being created every day from a seemingly unlimited number of embedded devices and sensors in the world.  An increasing number of enterprise companies need to capture and analyze large data sets from the field – and need Internet of Things solutions to make it happen.

IoT scenario: data come from sensors in the field, M2M IoT Gateways, Integration Platform and Business Apps

If your company fits into this category, you are likely putting a strategy in place to bolster your IT infrastructure to capture and analyze these large data sets in 2015.

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